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Has Cedeno figured it out?


Jerry Mumphrey
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Hi all, I've noticed Ronny has been much more effective at the plate the past few weeks and he seems to suddenly be hitting like the '05 version we were hearing about with huge numbers in AAA and winter ball. I think I heard the coaches picked up on a flaw, but I can't remember what. Maybe Gene Clines can coach hitting a bit, although I must admit all this time I thought Clines was completely useless and just here to ride the Dusty gravy-train.
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Welcome!

 

It's too early to tell if Cedeno has figured anything out.

 

Considering he was only projected as a .267/.313/.378 hitter for 2006, expectations for him for already low, and he hasn't met those expectations thus far.

 

PECOTA doesn't expect him to be an above average offensive player until the year 2010.

 

I want him to do well, but I'm not optomistic about him at all.

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Welcome to the forums!

 

The Cubs.com explanation:

 

Cedeno credits his recent success to taking extra swings before the game and turning his head so that he's seeing the ball with both eyes.

 

"I saw the ball real good today," Cedeno said. "When I hit the ball, I didn't know it was gone, but I had good speed on my bat."

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Welcome to the forums!

 

The Cubs.com explanation:

 

Cedeno credits his recent success to taking extra swings before the game and turning his head so that he's seeing the ball with both eyes.

 

"I saw the ball real good today," Cedeno said. "When I hit the ball, I didn't know it was gone, but I had good speed on my bat."

 

Holy crap my HS kids know to do this. Sometimes it just amazes me how little these guys know about their craft.

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Welcome to the forums!

 

The Cubs.com explanation:

 

Cedeno credits his recent success to taking extra swings before the game and turning his head so that he's seeing the ball with both eyes.

 

"I saw the ball real good today," Cedeno said. "When I hit the ball, I didn't know it was gone, but I had good speed on my bat."

 

Holy crap my HS kids know to do this. Sometimes it just amazes me how little these guys know about their craft.

 

Not surprising to me. Some people just have natural ability and can be very successful while knowing very little about their craft. I think Vlad Guerrero may be the best at this.

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Welcome to the forums!

 

The Cubs.com explanation:

 

Cedeno credits his recent success to taking extra swings before the game and turning his head so that he's seeing the ball with both eyes.

 

"I saw the ball real good today," Cedeno said. "When I hit the ball, I didn't know it was gone, but I had good speed on my bat."

 

Holy crap my HS kids know to do this. Sometimes it just amazes me how little these guys know about their craft.

 

Not surprising to me. Some people just have natural ability and can be very successful while knowing very little about their craft. I think Vlad Guerrero may be the best at this.

 

True. I understand if you are successful like Vlad but with all the coaching these guys get I'm just shocked that something this simple has taken him so long to do. I'm curious if Bazzaro Vlad with good plate disipline would be a better hitter.

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Hi all, I've noticed Ronny has been much more effective at the plate the past few weeks and he seems to suddenly be hitting like the '05 version we were hearing about with huge numbers in AAA and winter ball. I think I heard the coaches picked up on a flaw, but I can't remember what. Maybe Gene Clines can coach hitting a bit, although I must admit all this time I thought Clines was completely useless and just here to ride the Dusty gravy-train.

 

I like Ronny, but he's got to improve a lot still. I will say he's one of the players that I watch the cubs game for though, him and Murton, both of them facinate me for some reason.

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Welcome to the forums!

 

The Cubs.com explanation:

 

Cedeno credits his recent success to taking extra swings before the game and turning his head so that he's seeing the ball with both eyes.

 

"I saw the ball real good today," Cedeno said. "When I hit the ball, I didn't know it was gone, but I had good speed on my bat."

 

Holy crap my HS kids know to do this. Sometimes it just amazes me how little these guys know about their craft.

 

it's easy to know what to do and another thing to do it. it's like telling hill to just throw strikes or jones not to swing at pitches out of the zone.

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Welcome to the forums!

 

The Cubs.com explanation:

 

Cedeno credits his recent success to taking extra swings before the game and turning his head so that he's seeing the ball with both eyes.

 

"I saw the ball real good today," Cedeno said. "When I hit the ball, I didn't know it was gone, but I had good speed on my bat."

 

Holy crap my HS kids know to do this. Sometimes it just amazes me how little these guys know about their craft.

 

it's easy to know what to do and another thing to do it. it's like telling hill to just throw strikes or jones not to swing at pitches out of the zone.

 

I don't think it's the same. When you go to the mound and talk to the pitcher he KNOWS he's not throwing strikes but if you find a flaw it may change the result. Knowing to face the pitcher with both eyes is hitting 101. Looking at the pitcher with both eyes is what you're suppose to do to give yourself the best chance to be a successful hitter. Everyone wants to throw strikes or hit pitches in the zone but you have to give yourself the best chance to do that by doing it the right way.

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Welcome to the forums!

 

The Cubs.com explanation:

 

Cedeno credits his recent success to taking extra swings before the game and turning his head so that he's seeing the ball with both eyes.

 

"I saw the ball real good today," Cedeno said. "When I hit the ball, I didn't know it was gone, but I had good speed on my bat."

 

Holy crap my HS kids know to do this. Sometimes it just amazes me how little these guys know about their craft.

 

it's easy to know what to do and another thing to do it. it's like telling hill to just throw strikes or jones not to swing at pitches out of the zone.

 

I don't think it's the same. When you go to the mound and talk to the pitcher he KNOWS he's not throwing strikes but if you find a flaw it may change the result. Knowing to face the pitcher with both eyes is hitting 101. Looking at the pitcher with both eyes is what you're suppose to do to give yourself the best chance to be a successful hitter. Everyone wants to throw strikes or hit pitches in the zone but you have to give yourself the best chance to do that by doing it the right way.

 

Sometimes, players can get by on natural talent, and succeed. Managers and coaches can be hesitant to tinker with a successful technique. If it ain't broke, don't fix it kind of approach. Then, when a player hits a wall, the flaw(s) are exposed and tinkering becomes necessary. You either adjust or fail.

 

Vlad is a good example - the guy hits everything. Tremendous natural talent. Under control, he could be even better, but then again, maybe not. You don't know until you try, but the player may sacrifice overall production by trying to minimize K's or something.

 

I think the key is know when to tinker with a player's approach, and when to leave it be.

 

JMO

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Welcome to the forums!

 

The Cubs.com explanation:

 

Cedeno credits his recent success to taking extra swings before the game and turning his head so that he's seeing the ball with both eyes.

 

"I saw the ball real good today," Cedeno said. "When I hit the ball, I didn't know it was gone, but I had good speed on my bat."

 

Holy crap my HS kids know to do this. Sometimes it just amazes me how little these guys know about their craft.

 

it's easy to know what to do and another thing to do it. it's like telling hill to just throw strikes or jones not to swing at pitches out of the zone.

 

I don't think it's the same. When you go to the mound and talk to the pitcher he KNOWS he's not throwing strikes but if you find a flaw it may change the result. Knowing to face the pitcher with both eyes is hitting 101. Looking at the pitcher with both eyes is what you're suppose to do to give yourself the best chance to be a successful hitter. Everyone wants to throw strikes or hit pitches in the zone but you have to give yourself the best chance to do that by doing it the right way.

 

Sometimes, players can get by on natural talent, and succeed. Managers and coaches can be hesitant to tinker with a successful technique. If it ain't broke, don't fix it kind of approach. Then, when a player hits a wall, the flaw(s) are exposed and tinkering becomes necessary. You either adjust or fail.

 

Vlad is a good example - the guy hits everything. Tremendous natural talent. Under control, he could be even better, but then again, maybe not. You don't know until you try, but the player may sacrifice overall production by trying to minimize K's or something.

 

I think the key is know when to tinker with a player's approach, and when to leave it be.

 

JMO

 

Oh I agree and it's really really hard to change a players aprroach after they have had success. But, it's like breathing, you have to do X amount of things to be able to hit at all and two eyes on the pitcher is one of them. This, IMO, is a basic you have to do it thing and a simple thing that should be taught to all players. A lot of players have bad habits and hit like Vlad but to make yourself the best you can be you have to be able to see the pitcher with both eyes. Instructors disagree on many things that can make you a better hitter but very few if any would suggest not using both eyes to see the pitcher.

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Welcome to the forums!

 

The Cubs.com explanation:

 

Cedeno credits his recent success to taking extra swings before the game and turning his head so that he's seeing the ball with both eyes.

 

"I saw the ball real good today," Cedeno said. "When I hit the ball, I didn't know it was gone, but I had good speed on my bat."

 

Holy crap my HS kids know to do this. Sometimes it just amazes me how little these guys know about their craft.

 

it's easy to know what to do and another thing to do it. it's like telling hill to just throw strikes or jones not to swing at pitches out of the zone.

 

I don't think it's the same. When you go to the mound and talk to the pitcher he KNOWS he's not throwing strikes but if you find a flaw it may change the result. Knowing to face the pitcher with both eyes is hitting 101. Looking at the pitcher with both eyes is what you're suppose to do to give yourself the best chance to be a successful hitter. Everyone wants to throw strikes or hit pitches in the zone but you have to give yourself the best chance to do that by doing it the right way.

 

When you go to the mound you need to tell the pitcher he's not breathing out of his eye's correctly.

 

 

Oh and tell him "Rose goes in front"

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